Shooting Supplies for Hunting

Thursday, August 31, 2006

Flashlights Recently, flashlights which use light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead (Smith & Wesson)

Flashlights

Recently, flashlights which use light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead of conventional lightbulbs have become available. LEDs have existed for decades, mainly as low-power indicator lights. In 1999, Lumileds Corporation [1] of San Jose, CA introduced the Luxeon LED, a high-power white-light emitter. For the first time this made possible LED flashlights with power and running time better than some incandescent lights. The first Luxeon LED "flashlights" was the Arc LS in 2001.

LEDs can be significantly more efficient at lower power levels, hence use less battery energy than normal lightbulbs. Such flashlights have longer battery lifetimes, in some cases hundreds of hours. At higher power levels, the LED efficiency advantage diminishes. LEDs also survive sharp blows that often break conventional lightbulbs.

LED flashlights are often electronically regulated to maintain constant light output as the batteries fade. By contrast a non-regulated flashlights becomes progressively dimmer, sometimes spending much of the total running time below 50 percent brightness level.

A common misconception about LED-based "flashlights" is that they generate no heat. While lower-power LED flashlights generate little heat, more powerful LED lights do generate significant amounts of heat. For this reason higher-powered LED flashlights usually have metal bodies and can become warm during use.

-

Flashlights

Recently, flashlights which use light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead of conventional lightbulbs have become available. LEDs have existed for decades, mainly as low-power indicator lights. In 1999, Lumileds Corporation [1] of San Jose, CA introduced the Luxeon LED, a high-power white-light emitter. For the first time this made possible LED flashlights with power and running time better than some incandescent lights. The first Luxeon LED "flashlights" was the Arc LS in 2001.

LEDs can be significantly more efficient at lower power levels, hence use less battery energy than normal lightbulbs. Such flashlights have longer battery lifetimes, in some cases hundreds of hours. At higher power levels, the LED efficiency advantage diminishes. LEDs also survive sharp blows that often break conventional lightbulbs.

LED flashlights are often electronically regulated to maintain constant light output as the batteries fade. By contrast a non-regulated flashlights becomes progressively dimmer, sometimes spending much of the total running time below 50 percent brightness level.

A common misconception about LED-based "flashlights" is that they generate no heat. While lower-power LED flashlights generate little heat, more powerful LED lights do generate significant amounts of heat. For this reason higher-powered LED flashlights usually have metal bodies and can become warm during use.

90 Rounder - Your Action Is Required On The Following Federal Legislation

Surefire

Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the production of high-quality "flashlights". Commonly found within the law enforcement and military fields, Surefire flashlights are also used in the civilian market for personal, occupational, and self-defense purposes. Their lights are often featured in TV shows and movies, such as the television show CSI.

Surefire models range from a typical 2-cell Xenon light to a large 20-cell HID model. They have also recently introduced a line of LED flashlights which offer several unique features such as electronically-controlled power regulation and modular assembly.

Most of their flashlights are powered by Lithium 123 A batteries that allows for compact size and weight while maintaining high power output and long runtime. The main material used in the construction of Surefire flashlights is CNC machined aerospace grade aluminum, with an option for mil-spec anodizing. Some models use Nitrolon, a proprietary impact-resistant, non-conductive, glass reinforced polymer.

Surefire's most popular product is the 6P Original. It is very compact, at only 5.1 inches (130 mm) long and weighing 5.3 oz (150 g). It uses two Lithium 123 A batteries to produce 65 lumens of light, which is roughly twice the output of a typical three D-cell flashlight.

-

Your Action Is Required On The Following Federal Legislation

Taser chairman to retire
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Taser International Inc. (TASR.O: Quote, Profile, Research) on Wednesday said Phillips Smith will retire as chairman of the stun gun maker and will be replaced by his son, Thomas Smith. Phillips Smith, who is also the father of Chief

Privacy Policy
Sniper Country PX is your complete source for tactical sniping and shooting gear. ... To prevent unauthorized access, maintain data accuracy and ensure the correct use of information, we ...

Sniper Country PX - Weapons and Accessories
Weapons and Accessories ... Contact Info . Sniper Country PX 3103 Pruss Hill Rd. Pottstown, PA 19464 . Order Line

Taser Chairman Phillips Smith to Retire
Taser International Inc. said Wednesday that Chairman Phillips W. Smith will retire Oct. 23 and be succeeded by his son, Thomas P. Smith. The stun gun maker also said Kathleen C. Hanrahan, former chief financial officer and chief of operations, will take

Tuesday, August 29, 2006

AR-15 MAGS - Rifle Scopes Until the 1990s, military use of

Rifle Scopes

Until the 1990s, military use of telescopic Rifle Scope was restricted to snipers because of the fragility of optical components, though they had been used as early as the American Civil War on rifles, and even earlier for other jobs. The glass lenses are prone to breakage, and environmental conditions such as condensation, precipitation, dirt, and mud obscure external lenses. The scope tube also adds significant bulk to the rifle. Snipers generally used moderate to high magnification scopes with special reticles that allow them to estimate range to the target.

Telescopic Rifle Scopes provide some tactical disadvantages. Snipers rely on stealth and concealment to get close to their target, and a telescopic sight can hinder this. Sunlight may reflect from the lens and a sniper raising his head to use a telescopic sight might reveal his position. The famous Finnish sniper Simo H yh preferred to use iron sights rather than telescopic sights to present less of a target.

The Israeli military began widespread use of telescopic sights by ordinary infantrymen to increase hit probability (especially in dim light) and extend effective range of standard issue infantry rifles. Palestinian militants in the al Aqsa Intifada likewise found that adding an inexpensive Rifle Scopes to an "AK-47" increased its effectiveness.

Today, several militaries issue telescopic Rifle Scopes to their infantry, usually compact, low-magnification sights suitable for snap-shooting, like red dot sights. American GIs in Iraq frequently purchase their own and carry them from home. The British army fielded the SA80 rifle with a 4 optical sight as standard issue to allow average shooters to fire more accurately. The Canadian Forces standard C7 rifle has a 3.7 optical sight.

-

AR-15

ArmaLite sold its rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt in 1959 after which the AR-15 was adopted by the United States military under the designation M16. Colt continued to use the AR-15 trademark for its semi-automatic variants. The "AR" in AR-15 parts comes from the Armalite name and does not in fact stand for assault rifle as is commonly believed. Today the AR-15 Accessories
and its variations are manufactured by many companies and have captured the affection of sport shooters and police forces around the world due to their low cost, accuracy, and modularity. Please refer to the M16 accessories for a more complete history of the development and evolution of the AR-15 parts and derivatives.

Some revolutionary or otherwise notable features of the AR-15:

Aircraft grade aluminum receiver
Modular design allows for a variety of accessories, renders repair AR-15 sight
Small caliber, high velocity round
Synthetic stock and grips do not warp or splinter
Front ironsight adjustable for elevation
Rear ironsight adjustable for windage and distance
Wide array of optical devices available in addition to or as replacements of ironsights
Semi-automatic and automatic variants of the AR-15 are effectively identical in appearance. Automatic variants have a rotating selective fire switch, allowing the operator to select between three modes: safe, semi-automatic, and either automatic or three round burst depending on model. In semi-automatic only variants, the selector only rotates between safe and semi-automatic.

Sunday, August 27, 2006

STURM, RUGER & CO., INC. (RIFLE SLINGS)

Ghillie suit

Snipers and hunters with extreme requirements for camouflage use a ghillie, or yowie suit. The ghillie suit was originally developed by Scottish gamekeepers as a portable hunting blind. The name derives from ghillie, the Scots Gaelic for "boy", in English especially used to refer to servants assisting in hunting or fishing expeditions. A ghillie dhu is a type of brownie which is supposed to disguise itself in leaves and vegetation.[1]


A US Marine sniper wearing a ghillie suits suits can be constructed in many different ways. Some services make them of rough burlap (hessian) flaps attached to a net poncho. US Army Ghillie suits are often built using a pilot's flightsuit, battle dress uniform (BDU), or some other one-piece coverall as the base. Ponchos made of durable nylon netting can also be used. Unscented dental floss is used to sew each knot of fishnet to the fabric, in the areas to be camouflaged. A drop of 'Shoe Goo' is applied to each knot for strength. The desired jute is applied to the netting by tying groups of 5 to 10 strands of a color to the netting with simple knots, skipping sections to be filled in with other colors. Making a ghillie suit from scratch is time consuming, and a detailed, high-quality suit can take 100 hours to manufacture and season.

A ghillie suits is usually prepared by assembling it, beating it, dragging it behind a car, and then rolling it in cow manure or burying it in mud and then letting it ferment. This makes it very much like wearable humus. A ghillie suit that closely matches the actual terrain of the zone of operation will stand out less, so elements of that general environment (local foliage or other matter) may also be included in the netting.

An inherent problem with ghillie suits is internal (and sometimes, external) temperatures. Even in relatively moderate climates, the temperature inside of the ghillie suit can soar to over 50 C (120 F).

High quality "ghillie suits" can be purchased online, but traditionally, soldiers in the armed forces construct their own unique suits.

-

STURM, RUGER & CO., INC.
blank. Corporate, Firearms, Ruger Studio, Casting, On-line Store. Safety, blank, Products, blank, Product Service, blank, News, blank, Resource Center ...

.22 LR CCI 32gr Stinger LHP (Ruger 22/45)
Test Weapon: Ruger 22/45, 5.5" bbl. Bare Gelatin, Denim Covered Gelatin. Gelatin Calibration: 8.6cm @ 621 fps, Gelatin Calibration: 9.4cm @ 598 fps ...

Ruger 22/45, Model P-512
Review of the Ruger 22/45, Model P-512. ... The Ruger 22/45 is a pistol that I often see questions about because it is billed as a "1911 trainer. ...

Ruger 22/45 Mark III Pistol Details and Reviews at GunDirectory.com
Reference guide and directory for hundreds of handguns, semi-automatic pistols, revolvers, rifles, and shotguns. Read or post reviews and comments from ...

AR-15 In December of 1959, Colt acquired manufacturing (TACTICAL SLINGS)

AR-15

In December of 1959, Colt acquired manufacturing and marketing rights to the AR-15. In 1962 Colt was able to get the Department of Defense's Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) to test 1,000 weapons in its Vietnam-oriented Project Agile. An enthusiastic report led to more studies from the Department of Defense and the Department of the Army, and despite strong Army opposition, Defense Secretary McNamara ordered 85,000 M16's for Vietnam, and 19,000 for the Air Force.

However, early reports showed that the M16 was not living up to expectations. These reports, presented to McNamara by the Ordnance Department, showed the M16 having reliability as well as accuracy problems. These reports in turn praised the Ordnance Department's own M14. While the M14 performed well, it was too heavy for the hot jungles of Southeast Asia, and its ammunition also would not allow more than 50-100 rounds to be carried on patrols, severely limiting its capabilities as an automatic weapon.

Further evaluation of the M14 and M16 was done by an independent agency. It concluded that M14 was not as bad as had been suggested by some, that the AR15 itself was not as good as its proponents had represented it to be. However, they did note that the " AR-15" had greater capability for improvement, and that its small size and weight made it a handier weapon in Vietnam.

The M16 was issued w/o proper training and inadequate cleaning supplies. Combined with the humid jungle of Southeast Asia, this caused problems and the rifle gained a bad reputation. Because tolerances were tighter than in previous military arms, the M16 had to be kept extremely clean. War correspondents filed reports where the M16 was jamming, and many were shown on the evening news. It was reported that our soldiers were being killed by a faulty rifle.

This led to Congressional investigations which turned up two related problems. First, the cleaning issue. As training was provided, supplies issued, and some redesign, M16 performed more reliably. The second issue dealt with the use of ball propellants instead of IMR propellants. Remington had developed the 5.56mm round using one type of powder, but the specification was changed during military contract production to allow an alternate. This powder caused more fouling and increased the rate of fire.

-

Rifle Scopes

Until the 1990s, military use of telescopic Rifle Scope was restricted to snipers because of the fragility of optical components, though they had been used as early as the American Civil War on rifles, and even earlier for other jobs. The glass lenses are prone to breakage, and environmental conditions such as condensation, precipitation, dirt, and mud obscure external lenses. The scope tube also adds significant bulk to the rifle. Snipers generally used moderate to high magnification scopes with special reticles that allow them to estimate range to the target.

Telescopic Rifle Scopes provide some tactical disadvantages. Snipers rely on stealth and concealment to get close to their target, and a telescopic sight can hinder this. Sunlight may reflect from the lens and a sniper raising his head to use a telescopic sight might reveal his position. The famous Finnish sniper Simo H yh preferred to use iron sights rather than telescopic sights to present less of a target.

The Israeli military began widespread use of telescopic sights by ordinary infantrymen to increase hit probability (especially in dim light) and extend effective range of standard issue infantry rifles. Palestinian militants in the al Aqsa Intifada likewise found that adding an inexpensive Rifle Scopes to an "AK-47" increased its effectiveness.

Today, several militaries issue telescopic Rifle Scopes to their infantry, usually compact, low-magnification sights suitable for snap-shooting, like red dot sights. American GIs in Iraq frequently purchase their own and carry them from home. The British army fielded the SA80 rifle with a 4 optical sight as standard issue to allow average shooters to fire more accurately. The Canadian Forces standard C7 rifle has a 3.7 optical sight.

Wednesday, August 23, 2006

www.sightlink.biz

AR-15

ArmaLite sold its rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt in 1959 after which the AR-15 was adopted by the United States military under the designation M16. Colt continued to use the AR-15 trademark for its semi-automatic variants. The "AR" in AR-15 parts comes from the Armalite name and does not in fact stand for assault rifle as is commonly believed. Today the AR-15 Accessories
and its variations are manufactured by many companies and have captured the affection of sport shooters and police forces around the world due to their low cost, accuracy, and modularity. Please refer to the M16 accessories for a more complete history of the development and evolution of the AR-15 parts and derivatives.

Some revolutionary or otherwise notable features of the AR-15:

Aircraft grade aluminum receiver
Modular design allows for a variety of accessories, renders repair AR-15 sight
Small caliber, high velocity round
Synthetic stock and grips do not warp or splinter
Front ironsight adjustable for elevation
Rear ironsight adjustable for windage and distance
Wide array of optical devices available in addition to or as replacements of ironsights
Semi-automatic and automatic variants of the AR-15 are effectively identical in appearance. Automatic variants have a rotating selective fire switch, allowing the operator to select between three modes: safe, semi-automatic, and either automatic or three round burst depending on model. In semi-automatic only variants, the selector only rotates between safe and semi-automatic.

-

www.sightlink.biz

Thor Defense, Inc. - Purveyors of the World's Finest Tactical ...
purveyors of the world's finest tactical equipment. ... Welcome to Thor Defense, Inc. We are pleased to have the privilege of working directly with ...

Mounting Solutions Plus (MSP)
Mounting Solutions Plus, a distributor of A.R.M.S., PRI Mounts (Precision Reflex), AIPMPOINT and ... Lightlink. The Lightlink product line includes the finest in tactical lighting and accessory ...

Thor Defense, Inc. - Purveyors of the World's Finest Tactical ...
purveyors of the world's finest tactical equipment. Thor Defense is here to serve you, our customers. Please call us to discuss

Thor Defense, Inc. - Purveyors of the World's Finest Tactical ...
purveyors of the world's finest tactical equipment. ... Thor Defense makes it easy to get the gear you need. As payment methods, we accept:

Tuesday, August 15, 2006

ar-15 Rifle Scopes & Sights Blog Archive The Podcast Pedant ... (TACTICAL SCOPE RINGS)


Rifle Scopes

Telescopic Rife scopes have both advantages and disadvantages relative to iron sights. Standard doctrine with iron sights is to focus the eye on the front sight and align it with the resulting blur of the target and the rear sight; most shooters have difficulty doing this, as the eye tends to be drawn to the target, blurring both sights. Telescopic "Rife scopes" allow the user to focus on both the crosshair and the target at the same time, as the lenses project the crosshair into the distance (50 to 100 yards or meters for rimfire scopes, 150 or more for centerfire calibers). This, combined with telescopic magnification, clarifies the target and makes the target stand out against the background. The main disadvantage of magnification is that the area to either side of the target is obscured by the tube of the sight. The higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view in the Rife scopes , and the more area that is hidden. Rapid fire target shooters use red dot sights, which have no magnification; this gives them the best field of view while maintaining the single focal plane of a telescopic sight. Telescopic sights are expensive, and require additional training to align. Rife scope alignment with telescopic sights is a matter of making the field of vision circular to minimize parallax error.

-

ar-15 Rifle Scopes & Sights Blog Archive The Podcast Pedant ...
Lacrosse . Lacrosse is a fast-paced team sport played by ten players (men) or twelve players (women), each of whom uses a netted stick (called the crosse) in order to pass and catch a very hard ...

Re: Mr. Akins - suppressors
Dear Forest. We guarantee that the AA will operate with a factory stock/orignial ruger 10/22. We hav...

I subscribed. Well worth it IMHO
Besides, how many more Italian sport motorcycle mags do you need to subscribe to "for the articles"?...

ar-15 Rifle Scopes & Sights Blog Archive AR-15 A. Origins ...
AR-15. A. Origins. The AR-15 Rifle was designed by Eugene Stoner and his team of engineers in the 1960 s for entry into U.S. military trials for a new battle rifle to replace the M-14

ar-15 Rifle Scopes & Sights Blog Archive male turkey (M14 ...
AR-15 . In December of 1959, Colt acquired manufacturing and marketing rights to the AR-15 . In 1962 Colt was able to get the Department of Defense s Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) to ...

MWG: AR-15 Magazines, Ruger 10/22 Magazines & Mini 14 Magazines
AR-15 Magazines, Mini 14 Magazines and Ruger 10/22 Magazines form MWG Company High Capacity Magazines

ar-15 Rifle Scopes & Sights Blog Archive Umlaut Arms ...
Flashlights. Recently, flashlights which use light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead of conventional lightbulbs have become available. LEDs have existed for decades, mainly as low-power indicator ...

MWG: AR-15 Magazines, Ruger 10/22 Magazines & Mini 14 Magazines
AR-15 Magazines, Mini 14 Magazines and Ruger 10/22 Magazines form MWG Company High Capacity ... MWG Company AR-15 Magazines, Mini 14 Magazines and Ruger 10/22 Magazines. MWG Company is the ...

50 ROUNDER: MWG Company
MWG High Capacity Magazine for is a distributor AR-15 Magazines, Mini 14 Magazines and Ruger 10/22 Magazines and other Shooting Supplies and Gun Accessories for the discriminating shooter (MAGAZINES ...

Surefire Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the (Revolver Grips)

Surefire

Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the production of high-quality "flashlights". Commonly found within the law enforcement and military fields, Surefire flashlights are also used in the civilian market for personal, occupational, and self-defense purposes. Their lights are often featured in TV shows and movies, such as the television show CSI.

Surefire models range from a typical 2-cell Xenon light to a large 20-cell HID model. They have also recently introduced a line of LED flashlights which offer several unique features such as electronically-controlled power regulation and modular assembly.

Most of their flashlights are powered by Lithium 123 A batteries that allows for compact size and weight while maintaining high power output and long runtime. The main material used in the construction of Surefire flashlights is CNC machined aerospace grade aluminum, with an option for mil-spec anodizing. Some models use Nitrolon, a proprietary impact-resistant, non-conductive, glass reinforced polymer.

Surefire's most popular product is the 6P Original. It is very compact, at only 5.1 inches (130 mm) long and weighing 5.3 oz (150 g). It uses two Lithium 123 A batteries to produce 65 lumens of light, which is roughly twice the output of a typical three D-cell flashlight.

-

AR-15

ArmaLite sold its rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt in 1959 after which the AR-15 was adopted by the United States military under the designation M16. Colt continued to use the AR-15 trademark for its semi-automatic variants. The "AR" in AR-15 parts comes from the Armalite name and does not in fact stand for assault rifle as is commonly believed. Today the AR-15 Accessories
and its variations are manufactured by many companies and have captured the affection of sport shooters and police forces around the world due to their low cost, accuracy, and modularity. Please refer to the M16 accessories for a more complete history of the development and evolution of the AR-15 parts and derivatives.

Some revolutionary or otherwise notable features of the AR-15:

Aircraft grade aluminum receiver
Modular design allows for a variety of accessories, renders repair AR-15 sight
Small caliber, high velocity round
Synthetic stock and grips do not warp or splinter
Front ironsight adjustable for elevation
Rear ironsight adjustable for windage and distance
Wide array of optical devices available in addition to or as replacements of ironsights
Semi-automatic and automatic variants of the AR-15 are effectively identical in appearance. Automatic variants have a rotating selective fire switch, allowing the operator to select between three modes: safe, semi-automatic, and either automatic or three round burst depending on model. In semi-automatic only variants, the selector only rotates between safe and semi-automatic.

Monday, August 14, 2006

Browning - Heart of Texas Marine Corps League

AR15

A. Origins. The AR15 Rifle was designed by Eugene Stoner and his team of engineers in the 1960 s for entry into U.S. military trials for a new battle rifle to replace the M-14. Mr. Stoner, working at the time for ArmaLite (a division of the Fairchild Aircraft & Engine Corporation), engineered a revolutionary new rifle utilizing non-traditional rifle materials such as aluminum alloys and plastics. It was initially designed around the .222 Remington cartridge. It was later, at the request of the Army, re-chambered in .223 Remington (5.56x45mm) which propelled a 55-grain bullet out of the AR15 at roughly 3000 ft.-plus per second. With the .223-calibered AR15 sight rifle, for the same weight, a soldier could carry more ammunition than the older .308 Win (7.62x51mm) ammunition for the heavier M-14 rifle.

After lengthy evaluation and revisions, the AR15 rifle was only adopted by the U.S. Air Force for use by its base security personnel. For a variety of political reasons, the Army did not select the rifle. However, as America became involved in the Vietnam War, Secretary of Defense James McNamara cut through the Army Ordnance Department s red tape and selected the AR15 for issuance to troops. The Army gave it the military designation of "M16".

In the Vietnam War, the rifle initially earned a reputation as being prone to jamming and stoppages. This was, in hindsight, due to three primary factors: 1) insufficient training of the troops on weapons maintenance, 2) poor-to-non-existent distribution of cleaning kits to those same troops in the field, and 3) improperly formulated .223 Remington ammunition which caused heavy fouling (a primary cause of stoppages). Eventually, the situation was recognized and remedied as troops were properly trained to keep their weapons clean and well-lubricated, issued proper cleaning kits, and issued .223 Remington ammunition that was properly formulated to burn cleanly.

B. The AR15 Legacy. Today, the AR15 rifle has become really one the most highly engineered and refined battle rifles of modern armies. It has since earned a reputation for reliability and accuracy. It has been in service in all branches of U.S. Armed Forces now for nearly 30 years. In the process, it has been upgraded from the "M16", to the "M16-A1", all the way through the latest "M16-A4". The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) and the U.S. Military Special Operations Command (SOCOM) also currently issues to its troops, the M-4 rifle, which is essentially an M-16 with a 14.5" barrel, collapsible stock, detachable carrying handle, and other special accessories such as laser/infrared sighting systems, reflex-type optics, grenade launchers, flashlight attachments, etc. For these Special Forces, the M-4 has also been in certain instances reconfigured to fire "full auto", as opposed to "tri-burst".

The current generation of military M-16 s and civilian AR15 accessories models differ from the originals in many ways, reflecting the improvements and refinements of the rifle over the last 30 years. Current Military Specifications (Mil-Spec) for the rifle s barrel is for a heavy barrel (HBAR), replacing the original lightweight barrel which was prone to overheating and bending. Nearly all current civilian AR15 sights now are built with Mil-Spec HBAR s. The original triangular-shaped, non-perforated handguards have been replaced by rounded, perforated, and heat-shielded handguards for rapid heat dissipation of the barrel. Other changes include; a tri-burst sear on the M-16 replacing the fully automatic sear of the original, adding a brass deflector to keep spent cartridges out of left-handed shooters faces, adjustable front sight and fully adjustable rear sight for windage and elevation, detachable carrying handles, etc.

Today s military contract for the M-16 variants has been awarded to Fabrique Nationale d Armes de Guerres (FN) of Belgium (though the actual rifles are built here in the United States). Colt s Manufacturing s Co., which lost the lucrative M-16 contract, has retained the smaller contract for the M-4 rifle mentioned above. It has been reported that prior to Colt s obtaining the M-4 contract, Bushmaster Firearms Co. had manufactured a limited run of M-4 s. (Note: According to recent firearms industry news, as of December 1997, Colt is currently in the process of acquiring FN.)

C. What s in a Name? The name, "AR15", in general is used by the shooting public in reference to all current rifles (regardless of manufacturer) made to look, function, and swap-parts with the AR15. Non-military contract AR15 s are also commonly referred to as "clones". The actual and original "AR15", manufactured by ArmaLite and then Colt (after buying the manufacturing rights from ArmaLite) has been discontinued for political reasons. Each manufacturer of AR15-patterned rifles now has its own moniker for the rifle these days; like Colt s "Match Target", Bushmaster s "XM15E2", DPMS s "Panther", and the hilarious Olympic Arms "PCR" for "Politically Correct Rifle".

-

Heart of Texas Marine Corps League
... who was to become the senior bayonet and unarmed combat instructor of black recruits, Arvin L. ... He elicited almost universal praise for understanding, ...

Fine? Why Fine?: American Life
... He is a 1968 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. ... there be any better fodder for Ace and his commenters than Cheney shooting a man? ...

The Power Broker
... Universal lens mount. Universal to Hasselblad lens mounting adapter ... Electronics, TTL APEC exposure meter, bayonet-mount, Zeiss 10x100 zoom lens, 2 ...

History News Network
... Hot Topics. Roundup. Blogs. Books. Features. HNN Podcasts. Student Shortcuts. Teacher's Lounge ... HNN. History News Network Because the Past is the Present, ...

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ndlpcoop/nicmoas/nwng/nwng0019.sgm
... Man ual, noticed 951 Manual of Bayonet Exercise, notd, 958 Marhle Faun, by ... with the sentiment of the universal brotherhood of man, a sentiment then ...

The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Story Of Isaac Brock, by Walter R. Nursey
... Fishing, shooting sea-fowl, and exploring the interior on horseback, were Brock's chief pastimes. ... Mount Hillaby rose 1,200 feet above[Pg 23] the ...

The Standard [Clarksville, TX], 1862-1865
... Smith, who died about a year ago, in ten miles of Springfield Mo. ... up, and soon the Bugle sounded to mount, and march It was so very cold, that ...

Saturday, August 12, 2006

Ar15 accessories - AR-15 gun accessories & shooting supplies Blog Archive ...

Surefire

Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the production of high-quality "flashlights". Commonly found within the law enforcement and military fields, Surefire flashlights are also used in the civilian market for personal, occupational, and self-defense purposes. Their lights are often featured in TV shows and movies, such as the television show CSI.

Surefire models range from a typical 2-cell Xenon light to a large 20-cell HID model. They have also recently introduced a line of LED flashlights which offer several unique features such as electronically-controlled power regulation and modular assembly.

Most of their flashlights are powered by Lithium 123 A batteries that allows for compact size and weight while maintaining high power output and long runtime. The main material used in the construction of Surefire flashlights is CNC machined aerospace grade aluminum, with an option for mil-spec anodizing. Some models use Nitrolon, a proprietary impact-resistant, non-conductive, glass reinforced polymer.

Surefire's most popular product is the 6P Original. It is very compact, at only 5.1 inches (130 mm) long and weighing 5.3 oz (150 g). It uses two Lithium 123 A batteries to produce 65 lumens of light, which is roughly twice the output of a typical three D-cell flashlight.

-

AR-15 gun accessories & shooting supplies Blog Archive ...
AR15 scope - Stolen Teddy Roosevelt Revolver Recovered. North Country Gazette, NY - Jun 18, 2006NEW YORK A stolen revolver once owned by former President Theodore Roosevelt has been recovered and ...

Back Issues of Christiana Magazine - Spring 2000 - Archaeology (AK -47 accessories) and the

Lacrosse

Lacrosse is a fast-paced team sport played by ten players (men) or twelve players (women), each of whom uses a netted stick (called the crosse) in order to pass and catch a very hard rubber ball with the aim of scoring goals, each worth one point, by propelling the ball into the opponent's goal. The team scoring the most points after four quarters, and overtime if necessary, wins. In NCAA men's lacrosse Video , the quarters are 15 minutes. In most high school lacrosse fan, quarters are 12 minutes long. In youth leagues, quarters are usually 8 minutes long.[1]. Under international rules, quarters are 20 minutes.[2] In NCAA women's lacrosse, two 25 minute halves are played. Women's high school games consist of two 25 minute halves.[3]

Popular mostly in North America, Lacrosse is one of the continent's oldest sports and the fastest growing sport at all levels youth, high school, college, and professional. Lacrosse is especially popular in the northeastern part of the US and is Canada's national summer sport (although Canadians commonly play the box lacrosse variety of the game which is described below). It is expanding westward, with burgeoning lacrosse communities in Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, California, Oregon, Florida, Tennessee, Texas, and Minnesota.

In its modern form, men's lacrosse is played on a field of grass or artificial turf. Each team is composed of three attackmen, three midfielders, three defensemen, and one goaltender. In men's lacrosse, players wear protective equipment on their heads, shoulders, arms, and hands, as body-checking is an integral part of the game. Women's lacrosse is played in a similar manner except with two additional midfielders per team. Players of women's lacrosse need only wear protective eyewear (except for the Jem Adams , who wears the same protective equipment as a men's goaltender [helmet, throat guard, chest protector, etc.]), as contact is not permitted apart from minor stick-checks.

The sport was invented by Native North Americans. Its name was dehuntshigwa'es in Onondaga ("men hit a rounded object"), da-nah-wah'uwsdi in Eastern Cherokee ("little war"), Tewaarathon in Mohawk language ("little brother of war"), and baaga'adowe in Ojibwe ("Lacrosse"). The game was named lacrosse by early French Kyle Harrison . It is commonly assumed that the name stems from the French term "crosse", for the shepherd's crooklike crosier carried by bishops as a symbol of office. Pieffe Francois Xavier de Charlevoix noted the resemblance between the crosier and the shape of the racket stick in 1719. However, the term crosse, which also translates as bat, was applied to the Native playing stick by the Jesuit fathers nearly a century before. Since there was only one ball, early players concentrated on first injuring their opponents with their sticks, and then moving easily to the goal. Their pitch was about one kilometre by one kilometre. Games sometimes lasted for days, and often players were gravely injured or even killed. Early balls were made out of the heads of the enemy, deerskin, clay, stone, and sometimes wood. Lacrosse has played a significant role in the community and religious life of tribes across the continent for many years. Early lacrosse video was characterized by deep spiritual involvement, befitting the spirit of combat in which it was undertaken. Those who took part did so in the role of warriors, with the goal of bringing glory and honor to themselves and their tribes, and as a religious ritual[4]. The game was said to be played "for the pleasure of Kyle Harrison."

-

Back Issues of Christiana Magazine - Spring 2000 - Archaeology and the
Samson. Everyone knows the story of Samson, the judge of Israel who lost his strength when can t prove the Bible to be true; it can only verify its historical accuracy. We shouldn t base our

Wednesday, August 09, 2006

BROWNING HANDGUN - Categories

Surefire

Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the production of high-quality "flashlights". Commonly found within the law enforcement and military fields, Surefire flashlights are also used in the civilian market for personal, occupational, and self-defense purposes. Their lights are often featured in TV shows and movies, such as the television show CSI.

Surefire models range from a typical 2-cell Xenon light to a large 20-cell HID model. They have also recently introduced a line of LED flashlights which offer several unique features such as electronically-controlled power regulation and modular assembly.

Most of their flashlights are powered by Lithium 123 A batteries that allows for compact size and weight while maintaining high power output and long runtime. The main material used in the construction of Surefire flashlights is CNC machined aerospace grade aluminum, with an option for mil-spec anodizing. Some models use Nitrolon, a proprietary impact-resistant, non-conductive, glass reinforced polymer.

Surefire's most popular product is the 6P Original. It is very compact, at only 5.1 inches (130 mm) long and weighing 5.3 oz (150 g). It uses two Lithium 123 A batteries to produce 65 lumens of light, which is roughly twice the output of a typical three D-cell flashlight.

-

Categories
... TOM MENCK, UNIVERSAL SHOOTING ACADEMY, VULCAN ARMS, YANKEE HILL MACHINE CO., INC. ... Install M4 Carbine Stocks Without Damage, ROCK RIVER ARMS ...

air soft holster
Air Soft Guns > Air Soft Accessories > Special Operations Universal Tactical ... M4 A1 Airsoft Electric Rifle AEG ONLY $89.95 - Bestek Green Gas 1000 mL HFC ...

Our Links
click to visit ASPI Tactical ASPI TACTICAL Manufacturers and distributors of shooting accessories for law enforcement, military and the prepared civilian. ...

Tuesday, August 08, 2006

Luger - WEIGAND: MAGNUM 1" Scope Rings - Silver (3 Ring Set): Mounting

Surefire

Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the production of high-quality "flashlights". Commonly found within the law enforcement and military fields, Surefire flashlights are also used in the civilian market for personal, occupational, and self-defense purposes. Their lights are often featured in TV shows and movies, such as the television show CSI.

Surefire models range from a typical 2-cell Xenon light to a large 20-cell HID model. They have also recently introduced a line of LED flashlights which offer several unique features such as electronically-controlled power regulation and modular assembly.

Most of their flashlights are powered by Lithium 123 A batteries that allows for compact size and weight while maintaining high power output and long runtime. The main material used in the construction of Surefire flashlights is CNC machined aerospace grade aluminum, with an option for mil-spec anodizing. Some models use Nitrolon, a proprietary impact-resistant, non-conductive, glass reinforced polymer.

Surefire's most popular product is the 6P Original. It is very compact, at only 5.1 inches (130 mm) long and weighing 5.3 oz (150 g). It uses two Lithium 123 A batteries to produce 65 lumens of light, which is roughly twice the output of a typical three D-cell flashlight.

-

WEIGAND: MAGNUM 1" Scope Rings - Silver (3 Ring Set): Mounting
MSP,distributor of A.R.M.S., SAMSON, PRI Mounts, AIPMPOINT, and other tactical quality shooting WEIGAND: MAGNUM 1" Scope Rings - Silver (3 Ring Set) Consumer Rating: none. Quantity in Basket: none

WEIGAND COMBAT: Mounting Solutions Plus (MSP)
WEIGAND: Weaver Super Light Aluminum 1" Scope Rings - Black (3 Ring Set) Code: WCO-3RS-01B MAGNUM 1" Scope Rings, - Black (2 Ring Set) Code: WCM-RNG-01B. Price: $39.95. Quantity in Basket: none

AR-15 In December of 1959, Colt acquired manufacturing (Sig Sauer)

AR-15

In December of 1959, Colt acquired manufacturing and marketing rights to the AR-15. In 1962 Colt was able to get the Department of Defense's Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) to test 1,000 weapons in its Vietnam-oriented Project Agile. An enthusiastic report led to more studies from the Department of Defense and the Department of the Army, and despite strong Army opposition, Defense Secretary McNamara ordered 85,000 M16's for Vietnam, and 19,000 for the Air Force.

However, early reports showed that the M16 was not living up to expectations. These reports, presented to McNamara by the Ordnance Department, showed the M16 having reliability as well as accuracy problems. These reports in turn praised the Ordnance Department's own M14. While the M14 performed well, it was too heavy for the hot jungles of Southeast Asia, and its ammunition also would not allow more than 50-100 rounds to be carried on patrols, severely limiting its capabilities as an automatic weapon.

Further evaluation of the M14 and M16 was done by an independent agency. It concluded that M14 was not as bad as had been suggested by some, that the AR15 itself was not as good as its proponents had represented it to be. However, they did note that the " AR-15" had greater capability for improvement, and that its small size and weight made it a handier weapon in Vietnam.

The M16 was issued w/o proper training and inadequate cleaning supplies. Combined with the humid jungle of Southeast Asia, this caused problems and the rifle gained a bad reputation. Because tolerances were tighter than in previous military arms, the M16 had to be kept extremely clean. War correspondents filed reports where the M16 was jamming, and many were shown on the evening news. It was reported that our soldiers were being killed by a faulty rifle.

This led to Congressional investigations which turned up two related problems. First, the cleaning issue. As training was provided, supplies issued, and some redesign, M16 performed more reliably. The second issue dealt with the use of ball propellants instead of IMR propellants. Remington had developed the 5.56mm round using one type of powder, but the specification was changed during military contract production to allow an alternate. This powder caused more fouling and increased the rate of fire.

-

Rifle Scopes

Telescopic Rife scopes have both advantages and disadvantages relative to iron sights. Standard doctrine with iron sights is to focus the eye on the front sight and align it with the resulting blur of the target and the rear sight; most shooters have difficulty doing this, as the eye tends to be drawn to the target, blurring both sights. Telescopic "Rife scopes" allow the user to focus on both the crosshair and the target at the same time, as the lenses project the crosshair into the distance (50 to 100 yards or meters for rimfire scopes, 150 or more for centerfire calibers). This, combined with telescopic magnification, clarifies the target and makes the target stand out against the background. The main disadvantage of magnification is that the area to either side of the target is obscured by the tube of the sight. The higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view in the Rife scopes , and the more area that is hidden. Rapid fire target shooters use red dot sights, which have no magnification; this gives them the best field of view while maintaining the single focal plane of a telescopic sight. Telescopic sights are expensive, and require additional training to align. Rife scope alignment with telescopic sights is a matter of making the field of vision circular to minimize parallax error.

Sunday, August 06, 2006

Academy Plastics Plastic Models

Camouflage

Smaller, irregular units of scouts in the 18th century were the first to adopt colors in drab shades of brown and green. Major armies retained their color until convinced otherwise. The British in India in 1857 were forced by casualties to dye their red tunics to neutral tones, initially a muddy tan called khaki (from the Urdu word for 'dusty'). This was only a temporary measure. It became standard in Indian service in the 1880s, but it was not until the Second Boer War that, in 1902, the uniforms of the entire British army were standardised on this dun tone for battledress.

The United States was quick to follow the British, going khaki in the same year. Russia followed, partially, in 1908. The Italian army used grigio-verde ("grey-green") in the Alps from 1906 and across the army from 1909. The Germans adopted feldgrau ("field grey") in 1910.

Other armies retained brighter colors. At the beginning of World War I the French experienced heavy losses because the troops wore red (garance) trousers as part of their uniform. This was changed in early 1915, partly due to casualties and partly because the red dye was manufactured in Germany. The French army also adopted a new "horizon blue" jacket. The Belgian army started using khaki uniforms in 1915.


The Bronze Horseman camouflaged from the German aircraft during the Siege of Leningrad (August 8, 1941).The French also established a Section de Camouflage (Camouflage Department) in 1915, briefly headed by Eugene Corbin and then by Lucien-Victor Guirand de Sc vola. The camouflage experts were, for the most part, painters, sculptors, theatre set artists and such. Technological constraints meant that patterned camouflage uniforms were not mass manufactured during WW I. Each patterned uniform was hand-painted, and so restricted to snipers, forward artillery observers, and other exposed individuals. More effort was put into concealing larger pieces of equipment and important structures. By mid-1915 the French section had four workshops - one in Paris and three nearer the front - mainly producing camouflage netting and painted canvas. Netting quickly moved from wire and fabric to use raffia, hessian, and cocoa - the integration of natural materials was always recommended.

Units of Camouflage who were artists, designers, or architects in civilian life were also largely used by the forces of the United Kingdom (Camouflage Section established in late 1916 based at Wimereux) and the US (New York Camouflage Society established in April 1917, official Company A, 40th Engineers set up in January 1918 and the Women's Reserve Camouflage Corps) and to a lesser extent by Germany (from 1917, see, for example, Lozenge - possibly the earliest printed camouflage), Italy (Laboratorio di mascheramento established in 1917), Belgium and Russia. The word camouflage first entered the English language in 1917.

Camouflage added to helmets was unofficially popular, but these were not mass-produced until the Germans began in 1916 to issue stahlhelme (steel helmets) in green, brown, or ochre. Mass-produced patterned, reversible, cloth covers were also issued shortly before the end of the war, although hand-made examples were in use from late 1914. Net covering was also examined, either fitted with natural vegetation or with colored fabric strips called scrim.

Specialist troops, notably snipers, could be supplied with various items of camouflage, including patterned veils for the head and gun, hand-painted overalls and scrim covered netting or sacking - an adaptation of the rag camouflage used in Scotland by anti-poaching wardens, gillies, the first ghillie suits.


Two HMMWVs, one in desert "camouflage", one in woodland.The first mass produced military camouflage material was the Italian telo mimetico ("mimetic cloth") pattern of 1929, used to cover a shelter-half (telo tenda), an idea copied by the Germans in 1931. With mass-production of patterned fabrics possible, they became far more common on individual soldiers in WW II. Initially patterning was uncommon, a sign of elite units, to the extent that captured camouflage uniforms would be often 'recycled' by an enemy. The Red Army issued "amoeba" disruptive pattern suits to snipers from 1937 and all-white ZMK top-garments the following year, but it was not until hostilities began that more patterns were used.

The Germans had experimented before the war and some army units used "splinter" pattern camouflage. Waffen-SS combat units experimented with various patterns, including palmenmuster ("palm pattern"), sumpfmuster ("swamp pattern"), erbsenmuster ("pea pattern"), and also telo mimetico ("mimetic cloth") using fabric seized from the Italians in 1943 - the Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler division often wore this pattern.

The British did not use disruptive-pattern uniforms until 1942, with the hand-painted Denison smock for paratroopers, followed in 1943 with a similar style M42 garment.


A Royal Norwegian Navy craft, in a splinter camouflage pattern.The US Corps of Engineers began wide-ranging experiments in 1940, but little official notice was taken until 1942 when General MacArthur demanded 150,000 jungle camouflage uniforms. A 1940 design, dubbed "frog-skin", was chosen and issued as a reversible beach/jungle coverall - soon changed to a two-part jacket and trousers. It was first issued to the US Marines fighting on the Solomon Islands. Battle-field experience showed that pattern was unsuitable for moving troops and production was halted in 1944 with a return to standard single-tone uniforms.

With the return of war camouflage sections were revived. The British set up the (camouflage) Development and Training Centre in 1940 at Farnham Castle, Surrey. Early staff included artists from the Industrial Camouflage Research Unit such as Roland Penrose and Frederick Gore, and the stage magician Jasper Maskelyne (later famous for his camouflage work in the North African campaign).

From 1978 to the early 1980s, the American 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment stationed in Europe used a digital camouflage pattern on its vehicles. During 1979 and 1980 the Australian Army experimented with digital camouflage on helicopters. More recently, battledress in digital camouflage patterns has been adopted by the Canadian Army and Air Force (CADPAT), the United States Marine Corps (MARPAT), and much of the military of Jordan.

-

Academy Plastics Plastic Models
Squadron/Signal Publications (183) ... The Soviet 20mm cannon was the most ...more information ... Academy Plastics 1/48 T-33A Shooting Star ...

Film School - History of High-Definition, History, HD Cameras and ...
All workshops are solely owned and operated by the New York Film Academy and are not affiliated with Harvard University, Princeton University, Universal ...

shooting supplies & ar-15 accessories
TRIJICON TRIPLE-K UNIVERSAL SHOOTING ACADEMY VINTAGE VZ GRIPS WALKER PROFESSIONAL GRADE FRONT & REAR PISTOL ... LEVELING DEVICES (Brass Signal Cannon) ...

glock sights & night vision: Camouflage - Shooting Supplies & Gun ...
Universal Shooting Academy (Ghillie Suits) · Camouflage - Founder - Spirited Woman · Ghillie Suits - Marine snipers help Saudis get on target ...

Beyond The Headlines - Nov. 15, 2004
Dozens of ABC affiliates across the country chose not to air the Academy ... of Canon broadcast lenses for its clients shooting reality TV shows such as ...

Shooting Supplies for Hunting
Sig T-Shirt Academy Target Black BlackHawk Universal BDU Belt Magazines Optics & Mounts ... Signal Cannon. Other Products ... and visit www.MD-AR15.com. ...

ar-15 Accessories & parts
The Universal Shooting Academy practical shooting school is located in Frostproof, ... folding front sights, AR-15 accessories, signal cannon, apparel. ...

SigARMS MOUNTS: Mounting Solutions Plus (MSP) (Guns)

AR-15

In December of 1959, Colt acquired manufacturing and marketing rights to the AR-15. In 1962 Colt was able to get the Department of Defense's Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) to test 1,000 weapons in its Vietnam-oriented Project Agile. An enthusiastic report led to more studies from the Department of Defense and the Department of the Army, and despite strong Army opposition, Defense Secretary McNamara ordered 85,000 M16's for Vietnam, and 19,000 for the Air Force.

However, early reports showed that the M16 was not living up to expectations. These reports, presented to McNamara by the Ordnance Department, showed the M16 having reliability as well as accuracy problems. These reports in turn praised the Ordnance Department's own M14. While the M14 performed well, it was too heavy for the hot jungles of Southeast Asia, and its ammunition also would not allow more than 50-100 rounds to be carried on patrols, severely limiting its capabilities as an automatic weapon.

Further evaluation of the M14 and M16 was done by an independent agency. It concluded that M14 was not as bad as had been suggested by some, that the AR15 itself was not as good as its proponents had represented it to be. However, they did note that the " AR-15" had greater capability for improvement, and that its small size and weight made it a handier weapon in Vietnam.

The M16 was issued w/o proper training and inadequate cleaning supplies. Combined with the humid jungle of Southeast Asia, this caused problems and the rifle gained a bad reputation. Because tolerances were tighter than in previous military arms, the M16 had to be kept extremely clean. War correspondents filed reports where the M16 was jamming, and many were shown on the evening news. It was reported that our soldiers were being killed by a faulty rifle.

This led to Congressional investigations which turned up two related problems. First, the cleaning issue. As training was provided, supplies issued, and some redesign, M16 performed more reliably. The second issue dealt with the use of ball propellants instead of IMR propellants. Remington had developed the 5.56mm round using one type of powder, but the specification was changed during military contract production to allow an alternate. This powder caused more fouling and increased the rate of fire.

-

SigARMS MOUNTS: Mounting Solutions Plus (MSP)
MSP,distributor of ARMS, SAMSON, PRI Mounts, AIPMPOINT, and other tactical ... WEIGAND: SigArms Trailside Hammerli .22 Caliber Pistol Scope Mount - Black ...

Samson Manufacturing by Big Sky Guns
Big Sky Guns - Samson Rails Mounts - Secure Online Store. ... Samson Manufacturing, Samson Rails & Mounts. Related Categories ...

AR-15 FOREARMS
"SAMSON OFS Rail 1.5 This 1.5 inch long rail is perfect for mounting lights and other devices at a 45 degree angle or in between our fixed positions. Mounts ...

gun_supplies2's Journal
Shotgun I-Mount. SHOTGUN SIGHTS. SigArms NIGHT SIGHTS. SigARMS SIGHTS Samson Manufacturing, AR-15 Parts & Accessories, Rail Systems & Scope ...

shooting supplies, gun accessories, Scope rings, Scope Mounts ...
Mounting Solutions Plus, Scope Mounts, Scope Rings & other tactical quality ... MSP is a distributor of ARMS, PRI Mounts (Precision Reflex), AIPMPOINT, ...

Night Vision
SIGARMS - Accessories: Rifles Mounts Optics & Sights Lights AR15 / M16 Parts and Uppers Gear Firearms MSP,distributor of ARMS, SAMSON, PRI Mounts, ...

Samson Manufacturing, AR-15 Parts & Accessories, Rail Systems ...
Walther p22 scope mount thing. It hasn't been used, just put on and taken off as I laughed. It comes with the two allen wrenches and the block thing that ...

ar-15 accessories and supplies Blog Archive MWG 90 ROUNDER for ...
SigArms Signal Cannon TACTICAL SLINGS 1911 grips AR-15 FOREARMS PRI Mounts glock sight colt handguns AR15 parts ruger MWG MAGAZINES scope ...

Samson Quick Flip FFS-B (folding front sight barrel mount ...
Rock River Arms, Sabre Defence, Samson Mfg. Savage Arms, SIGARMS, SKB Cases ... Samson FFS (folding front sight) - barrel mount barrel mount lightweight ...

SIGARMS : Talon Arms!, Your on-line Tactical Tool Box
SIGARMS - Accessories: Rifles Mounts Optics & Sights Lights AR15 / M16 Parts and Uppers Gear Firearms ... Aimpoint 3x Magnifier w/ Samson Quick Flip R ...

Friday, August 04, 2006

TriTECH TACTICAL SLING for M-4 SIDE MOUNT, Left Hand Black ...

AR-15

ArmaLite sold its rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt in 1959 after which the AR-15 was adopted by the United States military under the designation M16. Colt continued to use the AR-15 trademark for its semi-automatic variants. The "AR" in AR-15 parts comes from the Armalite name and does not in fact stand for assault rifle as is commonly believed. Today the AR-15 Accessories
and its variations are manufactured by many companies and have captured the affection of sport shooters and police forces around the world due to their low cost, accuracy, and modularity. Please refer to the M16 accessories for a more complete history of the development and evolution of the AR-15 parts and derivatives.

Some revolutionary or otherwise notable features of the AR-15:

Aircraft grade aluminum receiver
Modular design allows for a variety of accessories, renders repair AR-15 sight
Small caliber, high velocity round
Synthetic stock and grips do not warp or splinter
Front ironsight adjustable for elevation
Rear ironsight adjustable for windage and distance
Wide array of optical devices available in addition to or as replacements of ironsights
Semi-automatic and automatic variants of the AR-15 are effectively identical in appearance. Automatic variants have a rotating selective fire switch, allowing the operator to select between three modes: safe, semi-automatic, and either automatic or three round burst depending on model. In semi-automatic only variants, the selector only rotates between safe and semi-automatic.

-

TriTECH TACTICAL SLING for M-4 SIDE MOUNT, Left Hand Black ...
TACTICAL RAPID ASSAULT SLING TRAS for the M-4 The Tactical Rapid Assault Sling (TRAS ) was designed ... MSP Code: TM4-SMC-LHB Price: Surefire Price @ MSP ...

Gu a Orientaci n Inmigrantes St. Paul Minneapolis
File Format: PDF/Adobe AcrobatYour browser may not have a PDF reader available. Google recommends visiting our de Norte Am rica es una de inmigrantes que llegaron, generaci n tras generaci n, con poco a su ... Suite 900 Tri Tech Center. 331 Second Ave. S. ...

TriTECH: Mounting Solutions Plus (MSP)
MSP,distributor of ARMS, SAMSON, PRI Mounts, AIPMPOINT, and other tactical quality ... SUREFIRE TRI - LINK TriTECH TriTECH TRAS TriTECH TRRL WEIGAND COMBAT ...

RIFLE SLINGS
TriTECH TACTICAL SLING - AR-15 M-4 SIDE MOUNT - Right Hand Black · Check Latest Price TACTICAL RAPID ASSAULT SLING TRAS for the M-4 The Tactical Rapid ...

glock sights & night vision: Gun accessorie - Guns & Shooting ...
TACTICAL RAPID ASSAULT SLING TRAS™ for the M-4 The Tactical Rapid Assault Sling (TRAS ) was ... TRITECH TACTICAL SLING - AR-15 M-4 SIDE MOUNT - RIGHT ...

- GayNewsBG
TriTECH TRAS TRI - LINK TRIJICON ACOG MOUNT TRIJICON REFLEX MOUNT TRIJICON MOUNTS ... 2004 MSP . All Rights Reserved . Aiming for Perfection ! ...

Shooting Supplies -Shooting Supplies
MSP is a distributor of ARMS, PRI Mounts (Precision Reflex), AIPMPOINT, AMERIGLO , EOTECH , HARRIS BIPODS , LIGHTLINK , TRI-LINK , TriTECH & WEIGAND COMBAT ...

TriTECH TACTICAL SLING for AR-15 (M16 A2) UNDER MOUNT, LEFT HAND ...
TACTICAL RAPID ASSAULT SLING TRAS AR/15 CAR (M16 A2) The Tactical Rapid Assault Sling (TRAS ) was ... MSP Code: TA2-UMS-LHB Price: Surefire Price @ MSP ...

Bienvenidos a Minnesota!
Estados Unidos de Am rica es una de inmigrantes que llegaron, generaci n tras ... Tri Tech Center. condici n y reuni n de familias. 331 Second Ave. S. ...

AAAA AAAAA AAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAA AAARGH AAB AABBCC ...
... TrapNumber TrapQueueBeg TrapQueueEnd TrapTable TrapUnique Tras Trautman Travan TravelMate TravelPorte Trcd Trdl TreeConnect Treq Tri TriTech Tribyte ...

Thursday, August 03, 2006

Digital Library related RSS news feeds (AR-15 FOREND)

AR15

A. Origins. The AR15 Rifle was designed by Eugene Stoner and his team of engineers in the 1960 s for entry into U.S. military trials for a new battle rifle to replace the M-14. Mr. Stoner, working at the time for ArmaLite (a division of the Fairchild Aircraft & Engine Corporation), engineered a revolutionary new rifle utilizing non-traditional rifle materials such as aluminum alloys and plastics. It was initially designed around the .222 Remington cartridge. It was later, at the request of the Army, re-chambered in .223 Remington (5.56x45mm) which propelled a 55-grain bullet out of the AR15 at roughly 3000 ft.-plus per second. With the .223-calibered AR15 sight rifle, for the same weight, a soldier could carry more ammunition than the older .308 Win (7.62x51mm) ammunition for the heavier M-14 rifle.

After lengthy evaluation and revisions, the AR15 rifle was only adopted by the U.S. Air Force for use by its base security personnel. For a variety of political reasons, the Army did not select the rifle. However, as America became involved in the Vietnam War, Secretary of Defense James McNamara cut through the Army Ordnance Department s red tape and selected the AR15 for issuance to troops. The Army gave it the military designation of "M16".

In the Vietnam War, the rifle initially earned a reputation as being prone to jamming and stoppages. This was, in hindsight, due to three primary factors: 1) insufficient training of the troops on weapons maintenance, 2) poor-to-non-existent distribution of cleaning kits to those same troops in the field, and 3) improperly formulated .223 Remington ammunition which caused heavy fouling (a primary cause of stoppages). Eventually, the situation was recognized and remedied as troops were properly trained to keep their weapons clean and well-lubricated, issued proper cleaning kits, and issued .223 Remington ammunition that was properly formulated to burn cleanly.

B. The AR15 Legacy. Today, the AR15 rifle has become really one the most highly engineered and refined battle rifles of modern armies. It has since earned a reputation for reliability and accuracy. It has been in service in all branches of U.S. Armed Forces now for nearly 30 years. In the process, it has been upgraded from the "M16", to the "M16-A1", all the way through the latest "M16-A4". The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) and the U.S. Military Special Operations Command (SOCOM) also currently issues to its troops, the M-4 rifle, which is essentially an M-16 with a 14.5" barrel, collapsible stock, detachable carrying handle, and other special accessories such as laser/infrared sighting systems, reflex-type optics, grenade launchers, flashlight attachments, etc. For these Special Forces, the M-4 has also been in certain instances reconfigured to fire "full auto", as opposed to "tri-burst".

The current generation of military M-16 s and civilian AR15 accessories models differ from the originals in many ways, reflecting the improvements and refinements of the rifle over the last 30 years. Current Military Specifications (Mil-Spec) for the rifle s barrel is for a heavy barrel (HBAR), replacing the original lightweight barrel which was prone to overheating and bending. Nearly all current civilian AR15 sights now are built with Mil-Spec HBAR s. The original triangular-shaped, non-perforated handguards have been replaced by rounded, perforated, and heat-shielded handguards for rapid heat dissipation of the barrel. Other changes include; a tri-burst sear on the M-16 replacing the fully automatic sear of the original, adding a brass deflector to keep spent cartridges out of left-handed shooters faces, adjustable front sight and fully adjustable rear sight for windage and elevation, detachable carrying handles, etc.

Today s military contract for the M-16 variants has been awarded to Fabrique Nationale d Armes de Guerres (FN) of Belgium (though the actual rifles are built here in the United States). Colt s Manufacturing s Co., which lost the lucrative M-16 contract, has retained the smaller contract for the M-4 rifle mentioned above. It has been reported that prior to Colt s obtaining the M-4 contract, Bushmaster Firearms Co. had manufactured a limited run of M-4 s. (Note: According to recent firearms industry news, as of December 1997, Colt is currently in the process of acquiring FN.)

C. What s in a Name? The name, "AR15", in general is used by the shooting public in reference to all current rifles (regardless of manufacturer) made to look, function, and swap-parts with the AR15. Non-military contract AR15 s are also commonly referred to as "clones". The actual and original "AR15", manufactured by ArmaLite and then Colt (after buying the manufacturing rights from ArmaLite) has been discontinued for political reasons. Each manufacturer of AR15-patterned rifles now has its own moniker for the rifle these days; like Colt s "Match Target", Bushmaster s "XM15E2", DPMS s "Panther", and the hilarious Olympic Arms "PCR" for "Politically Correct Rifle".

-

Digital Library related RSS news feeds
Deutsche Telekom T-Com, University of Edinburgh, Chinese Academy wanted to pass along a link regarding the location we're shooting beta test launch--already has deals with Sony BMG and Universal

www.speech.cs.cmu.edu
ACADEMY. ACADEMY'S. ACADIA. ACAPULCO. ACCEDE. ACCEDED. ACCEDING. ACCELERANT. ACCELERANTS. ACCELERATE. ACCELERATED. ACCELERATES. ACCELERATING. ACCELERATION. ACCELERATOR. ACCELERATORS

GUN ACCESSORIES & FLASHLIGHTS
Sig T-Shirt Academy Target Black BlackHawk Universal BDU Belt Magazines Optics & Mounts Cases & Drag Bags Scope Covers Shooting WEIGAND COMBAT. SMITH & WESSON MOUNTS AR15.COM :: Forums

big body builder
big body builder body|3526|3.791|3526|3.79 big|2653|2.853|6179|6.64. builder|2452|2.637|8631|9.28 the|2449|2.633|11080

memory.psych.upenn.edu
academy 24. acadia 1. acala 5. acapulco 1. accacia 4. accademia 1. accardo 1. accede 1. acceded 1. accelerate 5. accelerated 13. accelerating 6. acceleration 17. accelerations 2

www.psych.rl.ac.uk
24 academy. 1 acadia. 5 acala. 1 acapulco. 4 accacia. 1 accademia. 1 accardo. 1 accede. 1 acceded. 5 accelerate. 13 accelerated. 6 accelerating. 17 acceleration. 2 accelerations

AR-15 gun accessories & shooting supplies
in shooting fundamentals is mostly universal, but the competence the military, a police academy or Scope Mounts - AR-15 SIGHTS . Guns Plus, Firearm Shooting Supplies WEIGAND: Taurus Scope Mount

American Handgunner Club 100 Pistolsmith Directory
Buckmark, High Standard, S&W M-41; custom scope mounts. Deluxe PPC, revolver and Grand Master Universal revolver for NRA Action Shooting TACTICAL SHOOTING ACADEMY & CUSTOM SHOP. D.R. and Barb

Pistol Grips& Gun Accessories
AR-15 Shooting Supplies: TriTech TRRL PISTOL LANYARD with Duty Belt (AR-15 SCOPE MOUNTS) Store Map WEIGAND: Taurus Scope Mount for M44, Raging Bull .454

Over the
exercisewill not only help CSSP draft a universal code,but it will also assist the Academy in slides. Slides mounted in plastic mounts are the possibility of either an accidental shooting or

AR15 A. Origins. The AR15 Rifle was designed by

AR15

A. Origins. The AR15 Rifle was designed by Eugene Stoner and his team of engineers in the 1960 s for entry into U.S. military trials for a new battle rifle to replace the M-14. Mr. Stoner, working at the time for ArmaLite (a division of the Fairchild Aircraft & Engine Corporation), engineered a revolutionary new rifle utilizing non-traditional rifle materials such as aluminum alloys and plastics. It was initially designed around the .222 Remington cartridge. It was later, at the request of the Army, re-chambered in .223 Remington (5.56x45mm) which propelled a 55-grain bullet out of the AR15 at roughly 3000 ft.-plus per second. With the .223-calibered AR15 sight rifle, for the same weight, a soldier could carry more ammunition than the older .308 Win (7.62x51mm) ammunition for the heavier M-14 rifle.

After lengthy evaluation and revisions, the AR15 rifle was only adopted by the U.S. Air Force for use by its base security personnel. For a variety of political reasons, the Army did not select the rifle. However, as America became involved in the Vietnam War, Secretary of Defense James McNamara cut through the Army Ordnance Department s red tape and selected the AR15 for issuance to troops. The Army gave it the military designation of "M16".

In the Vietnam War, the rifle initially earned a reputation as being prone to jamming and stoppages. This was, in hindsight, due to three primary factors: 1) insufficient training of the troops on weapons maintenance, 2) poor-to-non-existent distribution of cleaning kits to those same troops in the field, and 3) improperly formulated .223 Remington ammunition which caused heavy fouling (a primary cause of stoppages). Eventually, the situation was recognized and remedied as troops were properly trained to keep their weapons clean and well-lubricated, issued proper cleaning kits, and issued .223 Remington ammunition that was properly formulated to burn cleanly.

B. The AR15 Legacy. Today, the AR15 rifle has become really one the most highly engineered and refined battle rifles of modern armies. It has since earned a reputation for reliability and accuracy. It has been in service in all branches of U.S. Armed Forces now for nearly 30 years. In the process, it has been upgraded from the "M16", to the "M16-A1", all the way through the latest "M16-A4". The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) and the U.S. Military Special Operations Command (SOCOM) also currently issues to its troops, the M-4 rifle, which is essentially an M-16 with a 14.5" barrel, collapsible stock, detachable carrying handle, and other special accessories such as laser/infrared sighting systems, reflex-type optics, grenade launchers, flashlight attachments, etc. For these Special Forces, the M-4 has also been in certain instances reconfigured to fire "full auto", as opposed to "tri-burst".

The current generation of military M-16 s and civilian AR15 accessories models differ from the originals in many ways, reflecting the improvements and refinements of the rifle over the last 30 years. Current Military Specifications (Mil-Spec) for the rifle s barrel is for a heavy barrel (HBAR), replacing the original lightweight barrel which was prone to overheating and bending. Nearly all current civilian AR15 sights now are built with Mil-Spec HBAR s. The original triangular-shaped, non-perforated handguards have been replaced by rounded, perforated, and heat-shielded handguards for rapid heat dissipation of the barrel. Other changes include; a tri-burst sear on the M-16 replacing the fully automatic sear of the original, adding a brass deflector to keep spent cartridges out of left-handed shooters faces, adjustable front sight and fully adjustable rear sight for windage and elevation, detachable carrying handles, etc.

Today s military contract for the M-16 variants has been awarded to Fabrique Nationale d Armes de Guerres (FN) of Belgium (though the actual rifles are built here in the United States). Colt s Manufacturing s Co., which lost the lucrative M-16 contract, has retained the smaller contract for the M-4 rifle mentioned above. It has been reported that prior to Colt s obtaining the M-4 contract, Bushmaster Firearms Co. had manufactured a limited run of M-4 s. (Note: According to recent firearms industry news, as of December 1997, Colt is currently in the process of acquiring FN.)

C. What s in a Name? The name, "AR15", in general is used by the shooting public in reference to all current rifles (regardless of manufacturer) made to look, function, and swap-parts with the AR15. Non-military contract AR15 s are also commonly referred to as "clones". The actual and original "AR15", manufactured by ArmaLite and then Colt (after buying the manufacturing rights from ArmaLite) has been discontinued for political reasons. Each manufacturer of AR15-patterned rifles now has its own moniker for the rifle these days; like Colt s "Match Target", Bushmaster s "XM15E2", DPMS s "Panther", and the hilarious Olympic Arms "PCR" for "Politically Correct Rifle".

-

Surefire

Surefire is a California-based company specializing in the production of high-quality "flashlights". Commonly found within the law enforcement and military fields, Surefire flashlights are also used in the civilian market for personal, occupational, and self-defense purposes. Their lights are often featured in TV shows and movies, such as the television show CSI.

Surefire models range from a typical 2-cell Xenon light to a large 20-cell HID model. They have also recently introduced a line of LED flashlights which offer several unique features such as electronically-controlled power regulation and modular assembly.

Most of their flashlights are powered by Lithium 123 A batteries that allows for compact size and weight while maintaining high power output and long runtime. The main material used in the construction of Surefire flashlights is CNC machined aerospace grade aluminum, with an option for mil-spec anodizing. Some models use Nitrolon, a proprietary impact-resistant, non-conductive, glass reinforced polymer.

Surefire's most popular product is the 6P Original. It is very compact, at only 5.1 inches (130 mm) long and weighing 5.3 oz (150 g). It uses two Lithium 123 A batteries to produce 65 lumens of light, which is roughly twice the output of a typical three D-cell flashlight.